Recruiting News & Notes

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A Closer Look At London Perrantes

Point guard London Perrantes, who earlier this month became the second high school senior to verbally commit to the University of Virginia, is entering his fourth season on Crespi Carmelite’s (Encino, CA) varsity basketball squad. He’ll be a team captain for the third straight season, a good indicator of the type of character UVa is getting.

“He’s a great kid with two great parents,” Crespi head coach Russell White said.

Crespi athletic director Matt Luderer also spoke to Perrantes’ character, saying, “I couldn’t be happier for London. He has worked so hard over the last three years for this opportunity. He exemplifies all aspects of the Crespi Man and I look forward to watching him grow and succeed at Virginia.”

Basketball-wise, Coach Bennett and company are getting a savvy player and terrific playmaker that has helped the Celts to the California Interscholastic Federation section semifinals and CIF state playoffs each of the past three seasons. Crespi captured the CIF section title in 2010. In total, the Celts have won 11 games and lost only two in the CIF section playoffs since Perrantes arrived.

“The first couple of games his freshman year, he didn’t play a ton,” White said, recalling the 6’1″, 180-pound point guard’s career to this point. “I decided it was time to fish or cut bait, to commit to playing him or not. We decided to commit, and so I made sure I got him in a bunch of games. He got a few starts due to injury, and he did well. He made some big plays. The next year it was his squad, but he got hurt 10 games into league play. He was playing unbelievable. His junior year was a great year. We played in sectional semifinals and the state playoffs. He was all-area and all-league. We play in one of the top two leagues in California. Last year, we had 10 D1 players in the league. We’ve played against a lot of great competition.”

Detailing Perrantes’ game, White said: “He sees the floor very well. He always has. He has an innate ability — and this is nothing I’ve taught him — to know what’s going to happen two or three seconds in advance. He changes speeds and makes ball-fakes as well as anyone I’ve seen, and I’ve been coaching high school since I graduated [California Lutheran University] in 1994. He is tremendous at changing speeds with the dribble and using ball-fakes to create openings. It’s off the charts.

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